Legacy YMCA Aquatic Center Newsletter, Issue 2


On August 21 I published the first issue of the Legacy YMCA Aquatic Center Newsletter, which discussed the benefits of exercise for people who have osteoarthritis.

This week I published the second issue of the Legacy Aquatic Center Newsletter. This month I write about foggy goggles. Enjoy!

My Swim Goggles

My Swim Goggles

Second Swimming Lesson Handout – Free Style


swimming blue water

My second swimming lesson handout contains step by step instructions and images for the front crawl.

The front crawl, sometimes called freestyle, is the stroke most people think of when they say swimming. Your body is flat and straight, with a rotating movement around the mid-line. Your head position depends on your buoyancy. Most swimmers keep the water line between the eyebrows and hairline; however, someone with little buoyancy may have to lower the head a little to raise the hips to the best level.

You can review it the entire handout by clicking the link below.

Freestyle Handout

My Swim Goggles

How to Apply Goggle Anti-Fog


Quick Start:

  • Squirt or spray anti-fog into your goggles, coating the entire inside lens.
  • Rinse your goggles (using pool water is OK) and then give them a shake.
  • Get on with your swim.

Overnight:

  • Carefully squirt or spray anti-fog into your goggles, coating the entire inside lens.
  • Give your goggles a quick rinse in the sink.
  • Position goggles with the insides of the lenses pointing upward and allow them to air dry.
  • Remember – keep your fingers off the insides of the lens!

First Swimming Lesson Handout – Breaststroke


I am giving private swimming lessons this fall and wanted to provide my students with reference sheets for them to take home and review to reinforce what we covered in class that day. I found some coaching tips and instructional videos on-line, but didn’t find anything that was written for an adult that is new to swimming, so I am writing my own.

My first swim lesson handout covers one of the most popular recreational strokes: The Breaststroke. I started with the breaststroke because of it’s popularity and because I think it is one of the least complicated strokes. In the breaststroke the arms and legs are doing similar activities simultaneously. Hands and feet together during the glide. Hands and feet out to the sides during the power portion of the stroke followed by hands and feet coming back together during the power portion of the kick. Since I am not much of an artist, I borrowed some wonderful illustrations from  the 1992 edition of the American Red Cross Swimming and Diving manual. You can see the results in the link below.

Breaststroke instructions

I also found this helpful video instruction on you tube.