Cranberry Pumpkin Bread


Now that fall is here it’s time to do some baking. In January my husband was advised to go gluten-free. As a result, I’m eating semi-gluten free. I still have wheat based breads from time to time, but I wanted to find a way to make my fall favorite (Pumpkin Bread) so both of us could enjoy it.

I found a recipe on the Glutino.com web site and made a few adjustments. The original recipe called for orange juice and orange zest. I choose to leave out the zest and substitute Pumpkin Spiced Cider for the orange juice. I also used pine nuts instead of walnuts, increased the amount of butter from 4 tablespoons to 6, and I increased the amount of pumpkin from 1 cup to 15 ounces. Here’s the link to the original recipe: http://www.glutino.com/glutino_recipes/orange-cranberry-pumpkin-bread/

Below is my adaptation:

Directions

  1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Use coconut oil to lightly grease a 9-x-5 loaf pan. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, combine the mix and the spices. Whisk and set aside.
  3. In another bowl, beat the brown sugar with the butter until fluffy. Add eggs, cider, and pumpkin and beat to combine.
  4. Add the dry ingredients. Beat to combine.
  5. Fold in cranberries and nuts.
  6. Spoon into prepared pan and bake 50 to 55 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the center comes away with just a few moist crumbs. Cool in pan for 10 minutes. Turn onto cooling rack and cool completely or serve slightly warm.
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Legacy YMCA Aquatic Center Newsletter, Issue 3


Time goes by so quickly, it’s hard for me to believe it’s time to publish the next newsletter. During the last week of September we had a few cold days here in Alabama; since then it has warmed back up, but I fear what will happen with the next cold snap. Our loyal water exercise enthusiasts will desert us. In an attempt to entice them to continue attending classes I have written about clothing options to help exercisers stay warm when the temps get cool.

The Legacy YMCA’s policy indicates you are to wear a bathing suit when using the pool; however, it is OK to layer on extra items to stay warm while exercising. Check out the links in this months newsletter to web sites that sell chlorine resistant warm-ups.

Screenshot Issue 3

Issue_3_October 20 2015

4 Foods for Healthy Aging


Prolonged inflammation raises the risk of many diseases, and there is no doubt that diet is an important factor in reducing inflammation. The following are healthy ways to reduce inflammation through diet:

  1. Eat a diet rich in omega-3s, including wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, freshly ground flax-seed and walnuts. Try to include an Omega-3 food item at least three times a week.
  2. Eat plenty of fresh, organic fruits and vegetables daily.
  3. Cook with extra virgin olive oil and reduce your intake of polyunsaturated vegetable oils (such as sunflower, corn and safflower oils).
  4. Use healing spices in your cooking: turmeric, ginger and red pepper can add zing to meals and are all naturally anti-inflammatory.

Legacy YMCA Aquatic Center Newsletter, Issue 2


On August 21 I published the first issue of the Legacy YMCA Aquatic Center Newsletter, which discussed the benefits of exercise for people who have osteoarthritis.

This week I published the second issue of the Legacy Aquatic Center Newsletter. This month I write about foggy goggles. Enjoy!

My Swim Goggles

My Swim Goggles

Second Swimming Lesson Handout – Free Style


swimming blue water

My second swimming lesson handout contains step by step instructions and images for the front crawl.

The front crawl, sometimes called freestyle, is the stroke most people think of when they say swimming. Your body is flat and straight, with a rotating movement around the mid-line. Your head position depends on your buoyancy. Most swimmers keep the water line between the eyebrows and hairline; however, someone with little buoyancy may have to lower the head a little to raise the hips to the best level.

You can review it the entire handout by clicking the link below.

Freestyle Handout